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is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states, and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had them meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
. joining me this morning is meg, the president of the national education association of virginia. we also have national nea representative dennis roikle with us as well. thank you for coming in so early this morning. >> good to be here. >> i want to start with you. overing picture, -- overarching picture, what is the big picture? what can we stand to lose because of the cliff? >> if nothing is double, it will be across the -- is done, it will be across the board cuts that translates into $4.8 billion. it will impact nine million kids, including 80,000 in head start. it will take a million dollars out of special education and we'll do awfully those cuts to kids and education so the wealthiest 2% of americans can have a tax cut. doesn't make sense. >> you're talking about spending on the federal level. you have to think about the money flowing through local coffers. fairfax county, the biggest school district in our region but a lot of people at home might be surprised that a quarter of kids are on reduced or free lunches. can they get by without those? >> they can't. when we look at the cu
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> we have been telling you about these two unlikely but powerful men who have teamed up to fight for same sex marriage in california. they say it is not a matter of being republican or democrat, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too
. and education could be cut by more than $4 billion. 100,000 children could lose their place in headstart. the white house says more than 25,000 teachers and aides could lose their jobs. the national education association, it puts that number even higher, closer 2080,000 jobs lost. mark moriel is the president of the national urban league and will cain is a cnn contributor and jane zahadi is a writer at cnn money. mark, all of this, all of this, is if they go over the fiscal cliff and they don't fix it, and they never fix it, right, the worst case scenario. my question for you. so much talk about taxes for the rich but isn't it true if the sequester goes into effect and isn't fix this will d disproportionately hurt the poor? >> it would because it would be tax increases on middle and working class americans and hard cuts across the board in defense and domestic programs, including education and job training so there's -- >> 700,000 mothers and children will lose nutrition assistance and 80,000 fewer child care subsidies and 14,000 fewer homeless would receive assistance. this is what agen
for public education. all of these negatives for the citizens of michigan that's what right to work brings to a state. it does not bring economic prosperity. i have heard the governor and some others say, well indians is getting a lot of jobs. that was only february they passed it. there is no way to know whether it's going to give new jobs or not. we know oklahoma -- there has beg a number of studies done in oklahoma it did not produce additional jobs. as a matter of fact, if you draw a comparison to two years before, the 10 years after, it's actually less investment in oklahoma. it's bad for michigan it's bad for anywhere. >> all right. >> right to work is about lessening worker's voice in government and the workplace. >> if it's not about economic development, is it more of a political action against the progressive movement? >> i absolutely thingk it is. we have seen all kinds of voter suppression, suppression of democratic rights. this is another example. the wealthy -- this is really driven by wealthy forces in michigan that you know well, the debos.
is the fact that veterans the most educated, highest skilled military ever to enter the civilian work force and they are our nation's next work force and employers need to be aware of that and in the book we talk about turn key methodologies and ways companies can reach out to veterans and recruit and retain them and use the skills that they have to offer. it's a great talent pool. >> specifically what are the specialized skills and training vets can offer employers? >> vets bring many things to the table as far as employment is concerned. they work in teams. they're focused on the mission. they are trustworthy, they always arrive on time, they're very punctual so they really bring quite a few things to the table but one of the most important things i really wanted to talk about related to this was the vets military friendly 100 list which lists 100 companies that have competed to be on this list and it's a great resource for veterans in maryland because you can sort that list according to state and so there's 70 companies that do business that are on the list right here in maryland and so
the stimulus package to wealthy bankers. $50 billion went to education services of stimulus. $35 billion to increase education. there is $250 billion that went toward programs they represent. >> bob: i see. healthcare extension -- >> eric: point the finger at yourself. urination? urinating on poor people, that is disgusting, wrong, rude. they should be -- you know what? pull the funding. pull all of their funding. >> bob: they fund themselves. you want to pull the funding, pull the rich people from the i.r.s. >> greg: what i love about this, in the video or the cartoon they show a state declining in the poverty. it's not caused by the rich, because rich are leaving. >> dana: last week in forbes.com there was ten or 11 death spiral states. you don't want a house and can't get a job and ones saddled with the pension debt from the public sector unions. we had a big fight in wisconsin over this. what we were we dealing with at the start of school? chicago teachers union when school was starting. what happened to schoolhouse rock? those were video where you could learn something. >> greg: you
of private housing, employment, education, meaningful relationships, as well as social participation. in addition, we will be working with the centers for medicare and medicaid services to develop, refine, and strengthen policies that promote independent living among all populations, especially those served by medicaid. we would also look with cms to promote home and community-based services and support. last but not least, i will be remiss if i forget to mention that may is also the time of the year when communities across nations come together to celebrate the older americans month. the proud tradition that shows our nation's commitment to recognize is the -- recognizing the contributions and achievements of our seniors. the theme for this year is "never too old to play." we want to encourage older americans to be engaged, active, and involved in your own lives and in your own communities. in closing, thank you so much for inviting me to speak at your summit. we wish everyone the very best, and we want to commend san francisco for again launching this important event today, and tha
, the left will find little things about texas. they'll say terrible in education. nobody's health care is covered. >> listen, if we were terrible -- >> and health care. >> -- but why would all the businesses copt to -- >> that's what they'll say. there's all the problems with texas. it's a horrible place. and nobody's covered by health insurance. the other knock is that i guess a lot of the business development is -- i don't know, what do they say, you've got these grants you give to private corporations. cronyism capitalism? >> we are competitive. >> they point to something and say what is it, federal, state grants to companies. >> it's called competition. >> is it crony capitalism? >> in the real world that's how you compete, you compete for those businesses. listen rick scott in florida is a competitor, bobby jindal, susan martinez, they are all competing for those businesses. if you want to sit there -- i'll give you a good example. i think the martin o'malley, former -- or still -- former dn -- >> he's in virginia now, right? >> no. i think he's up in maryland. >> yeah, yeah, yeah
of education which the court held it was unconstitutional. so why wait until 1967 to hear the case about interracial marriage. here are all of the states that had laws on the books. banning interracial marriage. by 1967 only 16 states still had the laws on the books. in the decades between 1947 and 1967 the years the supreme court was staying mum on the issue, most states decided on their own. the court was following on their heels, following the heels of public opinion. this is a big debate in the legal world. is the supreme court influenced by american public opinion? these are nine people who could completely ignore the will of the people. they are appointed for life. they can totally ignore us if they choose. many legal experts say that's not how it works. they are swayed by what the people think about issues. they announced they would hear two cases involving same-sex marriage. that's huge. they would hear the prop 8 case out of california. that's the california ballot proposition which amended the california constitution to define marriage between a man and a woman. the court will
of chicago. that's how it happened. find those 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of a lot of these islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is a response to the corruption of these you sponsored regimes. i would say that in the case of gaza which you mentioned, rob, that was a very series component. any thoughts how to combat that or includes this in the right direction? >> for the record i'm against corruption. [laughter] , good, good, good. >> wanted to clear that up. yes, look. it goes back to the point i thought it made in my remarks that islamists didn't win and non-islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or the divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services. they lose by being so corrupt. they lose by being ossified. they lose, and i islamists are there like they been for eight years to take advantage of whatever opportunity, violence or through nonviolence. we didn't discuss their relationship with
you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. ♪ over the river and down the road ♪ [ female announcer ] at nature valley, we know nature comes together in amazing ways. that's why we bring together natural ingredients, like dark chocolate with toasted oats, or sweet golden honey. perfect combinations of nature's delicious ingredients, from nature valley. ♪ ♪ i was thinking that i hope this never ends ♪ [ female announcer ] nature valley granola bars, nature at its most delicious. >>> thank you for joining us on this thursday morning. the title is paper boy but at one man's age probably considered a paper man. >> the 86-year-old great grandfather loves riding his bike. he does it delivering newspapers. bud share loads the basket with bulletins and every afternoon at 3:00 the great grandpa delivers and becomes a paper boy. >> he says delivering the paper is not just a job. but an opportunity to get
while still being able to invest in things like education and research and development that are important to our growth and if we're going to protect middle class families, then we're going to have to have higher rates for the wealthiest americans, folks like me. >> white house correspondent dan loa lothian is in washington, d.c. this morning. so who has the ball? and whose court is it in at this point? >> reporter: first of all, we know that house gop had that counter offer, which white house spokesman jay carney has referred to as, quote, magic beans and fairy dust. we expect for republicans to put pressure on the white house to engage. in addition to that, to lock for whatever ways the white house might be able to look for cuts to entitlements. i think what's difficult now is to figure out exactly where the negotiations stand because from the white house perspective, they're saying that conversations continue, but there are house republican aids who are telling me that there are no phone conversations, no e-mails being exchanged. so it's difficult to tell how they ca
. years or 22 years old. i have spent of this entire year try to educate myself a lot more on the whole -- let me get right to the point. i think it should be a state decision. the supreme court should allow the states to make the kind of a decision. giving more people -- in giving more power to the government to regulate this on a national level will create so many issues down the road, and it probably a lot of issues in the immediate -- the reason we even got to this. is because we get some much power to the government to regulate all of the different things and issues. giving them more power is just going to create more problems. my basic thought is, more government power, more issues. host: we will leave it there. victor on the republican line. caller: i do not think the supreme court should even hear the case on gay marriage. our country was built on marriage. it is an abomination to rid it should not even be brought up again to the supreme court. host: why not let them handle it since courts have weighed in on a in california? caller: california is already full of abomination as i
of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomorrow's cars, nearly indestructible laptops, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. >>> the republican speaker of the house john boehner is placing all the blame on president obama for another week lost in the race to stop the country from going over the fiscal cliff. what the speaker didn't say in a news conference today could potentially be very significant. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. >> reporter: reckless was the strong word the speaker used to describe timothy geithner's statement that he is willing to go over the cliff if republicans don't g
regularly played educational games with the boys in her nursery. and was actively involved in drop-offs and pickups at a day school in london. >> that was not okay with diana. >> reporter: in later years, william and harry would call diana, quite simply, the best mother in the world. those are some big maternal shoes to fill. but royal watchers predict kate is up to the challenge. >> i think william and kate's parenting styles may be similar to what diana did. and i think william and kate are going to follow that model, to do everything they can to ensure as normal a childhood as possible. but at the same time, educating their child for the future roles. >> i know it's a little early. but names are already being floated out there. and they may not surprise you. for a girl, we're hearing elizabeth. and for boys, charles or edward. and, yes. british bookies are in on the act. 6-1 odds that the royal baby is a redhead. josh? >> i'll take those odds. we'll be right back with you. >>> and ahead here, gold medalist gabrielle douglas here live. why she almost quit gymnastics just months b
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back to "hardball." now time for the "sideshow." first, 38 republicans voted this week to defeat a u.n. treaty that promotes rights for disabled citizens worldwide. last night jon stewart took them on. >> i guess it's time for a new segment "please tell me this is rock bottom." it's official, republicans hate the united nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs. you voted no because your fear is if we sign onto a treaty that is only recommendations for improved disability standards, standards we ourselves made the law of the land in this country 20 years ago, what's to stop the men if blue helmets from storming into your living room -- - i'm sorry, school -- and force you to build a wheelchair accessible ramp to the cafeteria -- i'm sorry, your kitchen. >> and from the tea party right to the liberal left. we had massachusetts congressman barney frank on "hardball" this week for an interview before he departs the congress altogether, but david
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> in 1967 supreme court ruled unanimously that race cannot be used as a basis to restrict marriage. this was a famous case. loving versus virginia. the amazingly named lovings were richard and mildred. in 1958 they travelled to washington, d.c. so they could get married. when they returned to virginia where interracial marriage was against the law, they were sentenced to a year in prison for getting married. when the judge in virginia sentenced them to prison he said "god created the races and placed them on separate continents. he did not intend for the races to mix." the lovings appealed that decision and won at the supreme court. but why did it take until 1967 for the supreme court to weigh in on interracial marriage? by 1954, the court had already ruled in cases involving race and discrimination. the most famous in brown v. board which the court held it was unconstitutional. so
. the most famous in brown v. board of education, which the court held unanimously separate was unconstitutional. so why wait until 1967 to hear the case about interracial marriage. here are all of the states that had laws on the books in 1947 banning interracial marriage. by 1967 only 16 states still had those laws on the books. in the two decades between 1947 and 1967, the years the supreme court was staying mum on the issue, most states decided on their own it was unconstitutional to ban interracial marriage, or at least was. the court was following on their heels, following the heels of public opinion. this is a big debate in the legal world. is the supreme court influenced by american public opinion? these are nine people who could completely ignore the will of the people. they are appointed for life. no election. no culpability. they can totally ignore us if they choose. many legal experts say that's not how it works. supreme court justices are, in fact, swayed by what people in this country think about issues. today the supreme court announced it would hear two cases
. that is deviating away from what the real problems in education are. if you know that finland has the number one school system in the world and part of that process is making the standards so rigorous and they only the best of the best and same time they pay significantly more for teachers and once they earned that title. they earned complete autonomy over the class roommate. part of the problem we have so much regulation and mandates and we are dictated to how to teach in our classrooms. what is the point in making standards when we don't have the option to use professional judgment as it am is. >> steve: thank you very much for joining us on the wednesday morning from beautiful orlando, florida. thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we have a hypochrissy alert. remember michael moor's latest ovie bashing tax rate breaks. >> steve: and a big secret and writing a letter to his younger self as a warning for others not to do the same thing. coach k will reveal that letter with brian next on "fox and friends" ♪ ♪ than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, bu
it -- represents a step forward for education programs. a very proud of them 3 >> 6 vote to inst your the of your co-host challenge. the finalists is from rocks bill. she said she felt compelled to contest as a message to everyone to follow their dreams. >> i have to tell you, you want be cool and you want to jump up and down. an opportunity like this, i do not know how much better it gets. friend,is our apparently. the voting ends tonight. for her come and go to cooper.com. maybe she had a hologram or something. >> she is created. -- creative. gordon peterson is in the with a look ahead. >> president obama was making case in virginia to and the the your tax cuts for wealthiest americans. with a falls church afternoon. we'll have the latest capitol hill over could happen should we go over the fiscal cliff. have a new report that moving into the s moving out who i and why. see you in a few minutes. >> tonight, we will find out happened to the president's scandal. cliffhanger left is wondering shot -- as the vice president takes control. e must all join hands and pray for our president. as you abou
are furious. claiming that seaworld employees trif trivialized the attack. seaworld said -- educators and animal care staff were at the attraction when this happened and immediately connected with the family. not the first time that a child has been biten by dolphins at seaworld. still, the park hasn't said whether the park will make any changes to this attraction. as for jillian, her mom said that her wounds are still visible. what her daughter is woirld about, the dolphin may be hurt after eating the paper plate. >>> all right, time for a check on the day's developing stories. back to ron. >>> good morning, everyone. in the news, the kansas city chiefs will play their profootball game today one day after linebacker jovan belcher killed his girlfriend and himself. the couple leave behind a 3-month-old fan. >>> and a fan falls from a ramp in college game, in charlotte, north carolina, the man suffered life-threatening injury after plunging 40 feet to the ground. >>> thousands of former crew members, ship builders and their families paid tribute to the world's first nuclear powered air
to be recruited for work across the country. his innovative approach to education led him to develop a block format curriculum that emphasizes a student-centered active learning environment, allowing students to participate in experiencal education from the very beginning of their studies and complete their doctor al degree in just three years instead of the traditional four. making roseman one of the most affordable pharmacy schools in the nation. during his tenure, dr. rosenburg helped transform roseman of a local school of 38 students to a regional institution with over 1,000 and offering an array of quality programs in nursing, dentistry and business administration. mr. heck: as he prepared for retirement, i commend dr. rosenburg for his vision, innovation and commitment to offering students an affordable, state-of-the-art education that has and will benefit the state of nevada and the nation. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from nevada yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >>
out by the steam fitters. this is put out by the teachers unions. these are the people educating our children. these are the people in whose hands we place the future of our country. they are passion on things that aren't just dishonest. that people get rich from tax cuts. but beneath them, they are side. this is bad economics. it's horrifying that any teacher in a classroom today believes any of this. >> trickle down does not work. trickle up works. the president is putting money in the pockets of those who will spend it. that why he has done small business tax cuts. trickle down we learned since the 80s with reagan, it does not work. martha: when i was a kid i learned the preamble to the constitution by watching "schoolhouse rock." this is -- it is so blatantly -- the phrase in here where he says the rich man shrugs his shoulders and says why should i care about other non-rich people. do you really think it's worth perpetuating the notion that people who are successful don't care about people who aren't successful? >> this is a cartoon that uses hyperbole to make a point and it's a
to the problem is for americans to become educated on how to cut spending. how you eliminate the tax deductions and expand the tax base so that you can increase the revenue without punishing segment of society. that doesn't it in the simp sob cartoon. they couldn't articulate that in a comical way. we are run by liberals who never spent a dollar they couldn't spend twice. obama could be a great foreign policy president if he pretended the enemies are rich americans. >> bob: you don't think there is waste in defense? >> greg: absolutely. i do think there is a waste of defense. >> dana: the waste in defense, climate change programs that they have to do. >> eric: greg pointed out things that are important. listen to the genius, howard dean. >> the only problem, truth is everybody needs to pay more taxes, not just the rich. >> that is not harasssy, that is honesty. honest moment for the first time. >> bob: can you tell us 30 seconds to tell us how to get the deficit down? >> greg: stop spending. >> bob: i get that. >> eric: i don't need 30 seconds. go over the fiscal cliff. take $1.2 trillion out
.e.d. while, it's a good intention, plenty of people have education who go out and kill people or drive drunk and end up -- >> greg: a dead kid isn't getting his g.e.d. and going to church. there is a punishment for that. >> bob: there are kids i know alcoholics who go for weekend in jail. there they have to do intensive therapy on the drinking and drugging. that makes a lot more sense than going, than forced to go to church. >> andrea: g.e. d/b/a behind bars. >> dana: maybe the judge exercising his judgment, saw something redeeming in this young man and thought that he was making the best decision based on his statement. nibble local control, counties and states should be able to pick their judges. i assume he's elected or appointed by political appointee. that is what they do. make judgments. >> eric: i make a point. we don't know if this was the defendant's proposal to say hey, i'll go to church and the judge said fine, put it on the list, too. >> bob: you don't think it will survive the courts do you? >> dana: i won't take the aclu seriously until they defend the guy who made the video th
of education when they are handing out these orders extending the principle at public accommodations. but it has a marriage case and gets rid of it and says this is too soon. and so it sits 11 years later to take it up. many of us thought this is exactly what's going to happen with the prop 8 case. the doma case is slightly different. but many of us thought the prop 8 case it's going to go back. it's going to be legal in california but nowhere else and the court is going to wait another ten years. >> so what are the implications -- the differing implications of how they could rule? what different parts of the gay marriage question e could they resolve? >> the doma case is a much more easy case. all it does is to return congress to its original position of following whatever states say the definition of marriage are. so it was crafted because it's a movement. they tend to be pro-state's rights and the liberals are pro-gay so arguing towards the middle, these are justice kennedy's favorite things. that's clearly a fifth vote for this case. we assume. so i think everyone imagined everyo
education families have come to expect from the children's museum. >> we're trying to promote global citizenship. we do it in a way that's very playful. >> reporter: this is my favorite exhibit. learning about food from all over the world. even if the food's not real. if you're interested in coming down to the children's museum, the grand opening is going to be december 14th. it will be open seven days a week and there's a $10 entrance fee. tracee wilkins, news4. >>> right now, president obama visited a northern virginia family today to put a face on the so-called fiscal cliff. tonight we talked with that family that's now in the national spotlight. >>> a well-known senator handed in his resignation today. >>> a few minutes ago the
, while still being automobile to invest in things -- able to invest in things like education and research and development that are important to our growth, and if we're going to protect middle-class families, then we're going to have to have higher rates for the wealthiest americans, folks like me. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. nice to have you with us. >> good to see you. >> what's the next move for republicans, dan? >> well, you know, i think republicans are in a difficult spot here. one of the sticking points is this $800 billion in new tax revenue. this is part of speaker john boehner's proposal. it doesn't call for more taxes on the wealthy, but it does call for eliminating some deductions, closing loopholes. nonetheless, there are some conservatives who are pushing back on this. they think that this will hurt job growth and these are conservatives who are backed by the tea party. they're outright rejecting it. what you're seeing here developing is that republicans are not speaking with one voice. >> republicans should not be con
say the american taxpayer helps subsidize their education because many of them receive world-class training at our public and private colleges and universities, and then reluctantly return home to pursue their careers because they can't get a visa or can't get a green card here in america. we are cultivating human capital and then sending those individuals back home. now, this is an area where there is broad, broad support. my colleague, senator moran, recently wrote a letter, had a "dear colleague" letter which points out that roughly -- well, he cites in the letter that more than three-quarters of voters support a stem-type visa. he quotes in this letter, dated july 20, 2012, "87% of democrats polled, 72% of republicans polled and 65% of independents support the creation of a stem visa." and, of course, if you think about it, it's just common sense. why in the world would we want to subsidize the education of these students from other countries, train them in these highly specialized and highly desirable fields and then simply send them home? i've introduced legislation ove
an opportunity you can take advantage of no matter your age, education or experience you can earn money on your own computer from your own kitchen table 24/7. all you need is a little extra time and effort and a little training you will get from the folks at incomeathome.com. check them out if you are sick of living paycheck to paycheck, worried about job security or retirement. if you are wanting to earn income part-time or full-time, incomeat asks home.com. adding listeners in record numbers. giving away a thousand bucks to somebody for checking them out. that somebody could be you, incomeathome.com. the twitter world, peter? >> peter: tweeting@bp show. telling you all of the ways to get in touch with speaker john boehner. mr. jk says don't worry. the g.o.p. does have a plan. when america crashes and burns at the bottom of the cliff, wall street will be there to pick up the pieces. era era says boehner needs to lead, follow or get out of the way way. obstructing is not one of the choices for my2k. >> yeah. >> honesty broker tweeting boehner is flab
the availability of the resources to solve that problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars to help us getting this word out to america. i think that is essential, because it's coming on very, very fast. there are things that are happening we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines and sailors and soldiers and their equipment overseas without any burden to our economy. not true. the truth of the matter is it's a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national security policy that defends the country that we love so much. so i think without having the ability and the willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this, and you're there to help us in giving the americans the answers to some of the very difficult and very cogent questions which they ask. i want to take this opportunity to thank robby for what he does . i met robby some years ago when he found my bottom office in an office building and came in, and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he's t
contribution. >> let me ask you one specific question to educate myself as i report on this. your proposal you put forward, more revenue than the president, what about the actual trigger for some of the capping of those deductions, limiting those deductions? is it the $250,000 mark? >> we convert to an 18% credit rather than putting an overall cap on deductions, which governor romney had proposed in the campaign. and i tell you, the reason we did that, having considered it, and bill is one of the leading experts in the country on this question, if you limit deductions, it has a differential effect, particularly on charitable contributions, because for high income taxpayers, that cap on deductions will be eaten up by state and local income tax deductions and what you're doing is socking it to the charitable sector by putting a hard cap on deductions. we thought it was better to equalize the rate by going to a credit system. middle class and higher income people all get 18% deduction rather than a millionaire getting 35 cents on the dollar for a dollar of mortgage interest deduction versus a tea
, he is -- he's a real leader. he's really smart. he's very well educated, has a graduate degree. he was raised all over the world because his parents were both in the military, both of them. and he has these core values. he was elected captain by his teammates as a rookie quarterback early on because he's signified this. i mean, this is a guy who helped put six points on the board after fumbling, a rare fumble, if you saw that play on monday night. >> yeah. >> sort of a weird play. we were all screaming, you know, that was a fumble! because obviously, if it hadn't been, it wouldn't have been six points. mike, he is really a very special character. this is not just spin. >> sam stein, i realize you went to school in the woods up there in dartmouth, but the idea of living in a metropolitan area, washington, d.c., where nearly everyone is obsessed with a single individual, the quarterback of the washington redskins, is incredible. >> andrea says this is not spin, but she's literally spinning. it's unbelievable, she's so happy with this guy. he fumbles correctly, this man walks on water
competitive globally like the central funding for education and innovation, and at the same time we also make sure we ask wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more and when it comes to our tax policy that if you work hard and play by the rules in america that everybody has a chance to succeed and that's why you've seen ceos from across the country sign on to that notion, with president obama, saying it's okay if we raise rates a little bit for folks who make more than $250,000 a year. the world is not going to come to an end. there are republican and conservative analysts and thought leaders like bill kristol who have said that. why the republicans in the house who really are still very entrenched with their tea party mentality have not yet understood that, and are still dug in, is really frustrating. >> the president has just said and i'm getting this reiterated to me from people who can actually hear what he's saying but saying to the leaders he's not opposed to tax reform. >> right. >> for you and the constituents that you represent, what is it for concession you're willing to bring to
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loans, free public education -- >> the 14th amendment, right, that says that anybody who is born in this country becomes -- is a citizen. so, so -- >> correct. correct. so essentially what's going on is they're buying their u.s. citizenship, and these types of businesses are promoting that. they're marketing by putting up a website, if you want to look up, in there it clearly indicates that you know if you want to come here to have a u.s.-born baby come here to chino hills, make sure you conceal your pregnancy so you can get your visa, and then at that point they promote all the benefits that come with that of being a u.s. citizen. >> i heard they were given a cease and desist order and you guys are still out there protesting. do you think it's not sort of done? >> it -- well it isn't done. there is no court order simply a letter that's been sent by the city council at this point. we don't know how long the process is going to take. it may take quite some time so what we want to do is get public pressure to mr. woo who is running the business to inform him we don't want this here
you an opportunity you can do. in matter your age education or experience, you can literally earn money on your own laptop from your own kitchen table 24/67. it is at least worth checking out. if you're sick of living paycheck to paycheck, worried about job security or retirement if your goal is to.earn extra money part-time or full time, they're adding my listeners in record numbers and giving away $1,000 to somebody just for checking them out. that could be you. lucky person. visit incomeathome.com. that's incomeathome.com. calls waiting. peter, the social media. >> on another topic bill, lots of people are asking us to comment on a big story that -- >> bill: uh-oh. >> today is the day -- >> bill: kate middleton left the hospital. >> we haven't gotten anything about that. >> bill: she did though. morning sickness -- severe morning sickness has subsided. >> it's over. she's feeling better. in washington state at midnight when the clock struck midnight, pot became legal. depending on who you ask. but
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